Keep Laptop in Top Condition for Long Time

Like every other electronic device, laptops also have their own warranty periods and that depends not only on the make but also on their usage. The usage and care of a laptop are sometimes far more important than their warranty periods. If a laptop is used and cared for properly then it could last you a good number of years and far more than the period of warranty given by the company. For best results make sure that you buy only from a good brand as most of them come with the guarantee of quality.

Here are a few things that you need to look after in order to make sure that your laptop remains in perfect working condition for a really long time.

  1. Cleaning the laptop with a cotton cloth is often highly underestimated. This often seems like a work that has no real advantage anyway, but holds on as a small thing like keeping the laptop clean from dirt plays a huge role in its longevity. When a laptop starts gathering dust or dirt, most of the times the delicate electronic parts in it tend to get clogged up leading to short circuits or failure. Keeping your laptop dirt free is quite a tiny job, but is really useful.
  2. Charging the laptop on faulty switchboards is, quite frankly, asking for trouble. Most of the times, these boards exhibit an affinity towards short circuits and power outages which often result in the destruction of your prized laptop beyond repair.
  3. Proper servicing and repairs of the laptop should be done at regular intervals to ensure that none of the issues affecting your laptop debilitate it beyond repair. But you should also make sure that the laptop repairers to whom you will hand over your laptop must have the skill and the trustworthiness to correct any issues.

Custom Cable Assemblies

While this may be a known fact for veterans of these industries, there are individuals that are pretty new to the scene that are still learning the ins and outs of how custom cable assemblies actually work and, in turn, benefit their chosen profession. Moreover, there are a number of individuals that operate from home in smaller scales that are in need of optimizing their own computing & mechanical abilities who really want to know more about how custom cable assemblies can benefit them.

First things first, it is important to have a working definition for a cable assembly. A cable assembly is a group of cables or wires arranged into a single unit. Cable assemblies are organized into an easier-to-install package that is easier to maintain & eventually replace as necessary. A sleeve provides protection to the assembly.

When delving into the world of customization, you as the customer need to have basic information on the type of application of the assembly. Assembly manufacturers want to be sure to provide all customers a quality product that meets their needs, but unless they know what the assembly is for, it’s hard for them to know how best to build the product. Moreover, you also need to provide accurate information about measurements for the amount of product needed because surplus material means an expense that wasn’t necessary on your part.

Certifications held by cable assembly manufacturers are a key thing to keep in mind and to look for from the very beginning. After all, certifications are a mark of competence and dedication to knowing the industry well. It also is indicative of a manufacturer’s dedication to its employees and customers as these certifications ensure safety protocols being followed, their employees are receiving up-to-date training in the materials they are using, and that safety is a high priority. Though it can be tough to navigate all of the certification in the industry, it’s important to look out for at least a few key acronyms: Figuring out what all the ambiguous letters and numbers involved in the huge array of certifications out there mean, can be mind-numbing. Unless you are in the business, most of it just seems like a bunch of nonsensical abbreviations, but there are a few very important ones to look out for: ISO certification, UL Registry, RoHS compliance, and IPC/WHMA adherence.

Finally, it’s important to be sure to know what type of lead time you require, as well as what type of budget constraints you operate under. Manufacturers are keen on maintaining production dates & working with a client’s budget while still providing a quality product that suits their needs. While these two bits of information are last on this list, they should probably be right at the top in terms of their importance.

Set Up Projector

1. Find your location

Your first step is figuring out the best location for your projector, you need enough space for the projection itself (which can go on either a wall or dedicated screen). Depending on how large you want your image to be, set it closer (smaller image) or further (larger image) away from the wall. Use a table as your stand for your projector and experiment with distances.

You’ll also want to ensure the height of your projector is correct. Most projectors are designed so that the lens is set above the bottom edge of the projection, so have the projector just lower than where you want the final image to appear.

2. Plug it in and turn it on

Plug your projector in and connect it to the source (that’ll be your laptop, tablet or smartphone). Then switch your projector on.

3. Calibrate your image

An image should now appear on the surface of your choice. Find a calibration image online and adjust the picture using the controls on top of your projector until you’ve got a perfectly rectangular (or 4:3) image that’s in focus. If you don’t know how to use the controls on the top of your projector, consult your manual for a guide.

4. Select your picture mode

Most projectors have a number of modes. If you’re in a dark room, a mode like ‘Cinema’ or ‘Movie’ will work just fine. If you’re in a room with ambient light, however, you need a brighter image, your projector should have a mode for that. It’s worth noting though that these modes typically skew green, which isn’t ideal for presenting graphic design work.

Info About Server Memory

DDR2 Speeds

DDR2 was new in 2003, and started with a peak transfer rate of 3200MB/s. Over time DDR2 transfer rates became available in 4266, 5333 and even 6400. The PC2-5300 was the most commonly used once it became widely accepted. It still is used in many servers and can still be found for purchase for older machines.

DDR3 Speeds

DDR3 surfaced in 2007 and with it came higher speeds. There are other measurements of speed other than the peak transfer rate, such as the data rate, which is measured in MT/s as well as the I/O bus clock, but for simplicity we will stick with peak transfer rates for this article. DDR3 started out with a speed of 6400, but more commonly used would be the speeds such as 8533, 10666 and 12800. Those would be the most widely used speeds although there was also 14933 and even 17066 PC-3 or DDR3.

DDR4 Speeds

In 2012 JEDEC, the company that oversees technical specifications for uniformity, released the standards for DDR4. With it came new DDR4 memory with peak transfer rates including 12800, 14933, 17066 and 19200MB/s. As with the other transitions to newer memory speeds that were available in the last generation are all but unused as the higher speeds become widely accepted.

With each new generation we have differences in the keyhole, which is a slot to ensure the correct memory module is being used. Memory from the wrong generations can’t be used in machines which don’t support it, and having the keyslot ensures the wrong modules aren’t inserted.

Other variations on Server memory are unbuffered, fully buffered, or registered. Many servers can use only unbuffered, or only registered, or only fully buffered memory. The difference is how the memory reacts to the information it’s given. Unbuffered memory doesn’t generally have error checking and correcting, and is therefore not ECC. While fully buffered, and registered memory include error checking and correcting.